Perspectives Blog

Daisuke Nomoto, Senior Portfolio Manager

Daisuke Nomoto is a director and senior portfolio manager on the international equity team at Columbia Management Investment Advisers, LLC (CMIA). Mr. Nomoto joined the firm in 2005 and has been a member of the investment community since 1993.

Prior to joining the firm, Mr. Nomoto worked as an equity analyst at Putnam Investments. Previously, he held a variety of positions for Nippon Life Insurance, including four years as a senior portfolio manager and equity analyst at Nissay Asset Management, Tokyo and five years as an equity analyst with NLI International.

Mr. Nomoto received a B.A. from Shiga University, Japan. He is a chartered member of the Security Analysts Association of Japan.


Should investors be cheering Japan’s new stimulus program?

Daisuke Nomoto, Senior Portfolio Manager | November 3, 2014

Stock markets rose on the announcement that the government of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe was significantly stepping up its policy actions. The other major announcement was that the Government Pension Investment Fund will shift its asset allocation to domestic equities and foreign bonds/equities away from domestic bonds. The near term risk/return profile currently looks very

Corporate governance – The next catalyst for Japanese equities

Daisuke Nomoto, Senior Portfolio Manager | August 4, 2014

Overhauling corporate governance to harness the power of private enterprise is critical to Japan’s growth strategy. Better engagement between corporate management and shareholders should ultimately lead to higher returns for holders of Japanese equities. We are focused on companies that can generate sustainable free cash flow, earn returns well above their cost of capital and

Does Japan’s sell-off present buying opportunities?

Daisuke Nomoto, Senior Portfolio Manager | February 10, 2014

What’s behind the Japanese stock market’s recent correction? What’s ahead for Japan’s stock market, currency and government policy? Why the risk/reward tradeoff looks attractive at current price levels Abenomics has already had a bigger impact on the Japanese economy and financial assets than the failed attempt at quantitative easing between 2001 and 2006 (see chart).